You can not select more than 25 topics Topics must start with a letter or number, can include dashes ('-') and can be up to 35 characters long.

main.cpp 177KB

Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
estimatefee / estimatepriority RPC methods New RPC methods: return an estimate of the fee (or priority) a transaction needs to be likely to confirm in a given number of blocks. Mike Hearn created the first version of this method for estimating fees. It works as follows: For transactions that took 1 to N (I picked N=25) blocks to confirm, keep N buckets with at most 100 entries in each recording the fees-per-kilobyte paid by those transactions. (separate buckets are kept for transactions that confirmed because they are high-priority) The buckets are filled as blocks are found, and are saved/restored in a new fee_estiamtes.dat file in the data directory. A few variations on Mike's initial scheme: To estimate the fee needed for a transaction to confirm in X buckets, all of the samples in all of the buckets are used and a median of all of the data is used to make the estimate. For example, imagine 25 buckets each containing the full 100 entries. Those 2,500 samples are sorted, and the estimate of the fee needed to confirm in the very next block is the 50'th-highest-fee-entry in that sorted list; the estimate of the fee needed to confirm in the next two blocks is the 150'th-highest-fee-entry, etc. That algorithm has the nice property that estimates of how much fee you need to pay to get confirmed in block N will always be greater than or equal to the estimate for block N+1. It would clearly be wrong to say "pay 11 uBTC and you'll get confirmed in 3 blocks, but pay 12 uBTC and it will take LONGER". A single block will not contribute more than 10 entries to any one bucket, so a single miner and a large block cannot overwhelm the estimates.
7 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago
Ultraprune This switches bitcoin's transaction/block verification logic to use a "coin database", which contains all unredeemed transaction output scripts, amounts and heights. The name ultraprune comes from the fact that instead of a full transaction index, we only (need to) keep an index with unspent outputs. For now, the blocks themselves are kept as usual, although they are only necessary for serving, rescanning and reorganizing. The basic datastructures are CCoins (representing the coins of a single transaction), and CCoinsView (representing a state of the coins database). There are several implementations for CCoinsView. A dummy, one backed by the coins database (coins.dat), one backed by the memory pool, and one that adds a cache on top of it. FetchInputs, ConnectInputs, ConnectBlock, DisconnectBlock, ... now operate on a generic CCoinsView. The block switching logic now builds a single cached CCoinsView with changes to be committed to the database before any changes are made. This means no uncommitted changes are ever read from the database, and should ease the transition to another database layer which does not support transactions (but does support atomic writes), like LevelDB. For the getrawtransaction() RPC call, access to a txid-to-disk index would be preferable. As this index is not necessary or even useful for any other part of the implementation, it is not provided. Instead, getrawtransaction() uses the coin database to find the block height, and then scans that block to find the requested transaction. This is slow, but should suffice for debug purposes.
9 years ago