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init.cpp 79KB

evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
6 years ago
estimatefee / estimatepriority RPC methods New RPC methods: return an estimate of the fee (or priority) a transaction needs to be likely to confirm in a given number of blocks. Mike Hearn created the first version of this method for estimating fees. It works as follows: For transactions that took 1 to N (I picked N=25) blocks to confirm, keep N buckets with at most 100 entries in each recording the fees-per-kilobyte paid by those transactions. (separate buckets are kept for transactions that confirmed because they are high-priority) The buckets are filled as blocks are found, and are saved/restored in a new fee_estiamtes.dat file in the data directory. A few variations on Mike's initial scheme: To estimate the fee needed for a transaction to confirm in X buckets, all of the samples in all of the buckets are used and a median of all of the data is used to make the estimate. For example, imagine 25 buckets each containing the full 100 entries. Those 2,500 samples are sorted, and the estimate of the fee needed to confirm in the very next block is the 50'th-highest-fee-entry in that sorted list; the estimate of the fee needed to confirm in the next two blocks is the 150'th-highest-fee-entry, etc. That algorithm has the nice property that estimates of how much fee you need to pay to get confirmed in block N will always be greater than or equal to the estimate for block N+1. It would clearly be wrong to say "pay 11 uBTC and you'll get confirmed in 3 blocks, but pay 12 uBTC and it will take LONGER". A single block will not contribute more than 10 entries to any one bucket, so a single miner and a large block cannot overwhelm the estimates.
7 years ago
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
6 years ago
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
6 years ago
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
6 years ago
estimatefee / estimatepriority RPC methods New RPC methods: return an estimate of the fee (or priority) a transaction needs to be likely to confirm in a given number of blocks. Mike Hearn created the first version of this method for estimating fees. It works as follows: For transactions that took 1 to N (I picked N=25) blocks to confirm, keep N buckets with at most 100 entries in each recording the fees-per-kilobyte paid by those transactions. (separate buckets are kept for transactions that confirmed because they are high-priority) The buckets are filled as blocks are found, and are saved/restored in a new fee_estiamtes.dat file in the data directory. A few variations on Mike's initial scheme: To estimate the fee needed for a transaction to confirm in X buckets, all of the samples in all of the buckets are used and a median of all of the data is used to make the estimate. For example, imagine 25 buckets each containing the full 100 entries. Those 2,500 samples are sorted, and the estimate of the fee needed to confirm in the very next block is the 50'th-highest-fee-entry in that sorted list; the estimate of the fee needed to confirm in the next two blocks is the 150'th-highest-fee-entry, etc. That algorithm has the nice property that estimates of how much fee you need to pay to get confirmed in block N will always be greater than or equal to the estimate for block N+1. It would clearly be wrong to say "pay 11 uBTC and you'll get confirmed in 3 blocks, but pay 12 uBTC and it will take LONGER". A single block will not contribute more than 10 entries to any one bucket, so a single miner and a large block cannot overwhelm the estimates.
7 years ago
estimatefee / estimatepriority RPC methods New RPC methods: return an estimate of the fee (or priority) a transaction needs to be likely to confirm in a given number of blocks. Mike Hearn created the first version of this method for estimating fees. It works as follows: For transactions that took 1 to N (I picked N=25) blocks to confirm, keep N buckets with at most 100 entries in each recording the fees-per-kilobyte paid by those transactions. (separate buckets are kept for transactions that confirmed because they are high-priority) The buckets are filled as blocks are found, and are saved/restored in a new fee_estiamtes.dat file in the data directory. A few variations on Mike's initial scheme: To estimate the fee needed for a transaction to confirm in X buckets, all of the samples in all of the buckets are used and a median of all of the data is used to make the estimate. For example, imagine 25 buckets each containing the full 100 entries. Those 2,500 samples are sorted, and the estimate of the fee needed to confirm in the very next block is the 50'th-highest-fee-entry in that sorted list; the estimate of the fee needed to confirm in the next two blocks is the 150'th-highest-fee-entry, etc. That algorithm has the nice property that estimates of how much fee you need to pay to get confirmed in block N will always be greater than or equal to the estimate for block N+1. It would clearly be wrong to say "pay 11 uBTC and you'll get confirmed in 3 blocks, but pay 12 uBTC and it will take LONGER". A single block will not contribute more than 10 entries to any one bucket, so a single miner and a large block cannot overwhelm the estimates.
7 years ago
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
6 years ago
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
6 years ago
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
6 years ago
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
6 years ago
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
6 years ago
Break addnode out from the outbound connection limits. Previously addnodes were in competition with outbound connections for access to the eight outbound slots. One result of this is that frequently a node with several addnode configured peers would end up connected to none of them, because while the addnode loop was in its two minute sleep the automatic connection logic would fill any free slots with random peers. This is particularly unwelcome to users trying to maintain links to specific nodes for fast block relay or purposes. Another result is that a group of nine or more nodes which are have addnode configured towards each other can become partitioned from the public network. This commit introduces a new limit of eight connections just for addnode peers which is not subject to any of the other connection limitations (including maxconnections). The choice of eight is sufficient so that under no condition would a user find themselves connected to fewer addnoded peers than previously. It is also low enough that users who are confused about the significance of more connections and have gotten too copy-and-paste happy will not consume more than twice the slot usage of a typical user. Any additional load on the network resulting from this will likely be offset by a reduction in users applying even more wasteful workaround for the prior behavior. The retry delays are reduced to avoid nodes sitting around without their added peers up, but are still sufficient to prevent overly aggressive repeated connections. The reduced delays also make the system much more responsive to the addnode RPC. Ban-disconnects are also exempted for peers added via addnode since the outbound addnode logic ignores bans. Previously it would ban an addnode then immediately reconnect to it. A minor change was also made to CSemaphoreGrant so that it is possible to re-acquire via an object whos grant was moved.
4 years ago
Break addnode out from the outbound connection limits. Previously addnodes were in competition with outbound connections for access to the eight outbound slots. One result of this is that frequently a node with several addnode configured peers would end up connected to none of them, because while the addnode loop was in its two minute sleep the automatic connection logic would fill any free slots with random peers. This is particularly unwelcome to users trying to maintain links to specific nodes for fast block relay or purposes. Another result is that a group of nine or more nodes which are have addnode configured towards each other can become partitioned from the public network. This commit introduces a new limit of eight connections just for addnode peers which is not subject to any of the other connection limitations (including maxconnections). The choice of eight is sufficient so that under no condition would a user find themselves connected to fewer addnoded peers than previously. It is also low enough that users who are confused about the significance of more connections and have gotten too copy-and-paste happy will not consume more than twice the slot usage of a typical user. Any additional load on the network resulting from this will likely be offset by a reduction in users applying even more wasteful workaround for the prior behavior. The retry delays are reduced to avoid nodes sitting around without their added peers up, but are still sufficient to prevent overly aggressive repeated connections. The reduced delays also make the system much more responsive to the addnode RPC. Ban-disconnects are also exempted for peers added via addnode since the outbound addnode logic ignores bans. Previously it would ban an addnode then immediately reconnect to it. A minor change was also made to CSemaphoreGrant so that it is possible to re-acquire via an object whos grant was moved.
4 years ago
Break addnode out from the outbound connection limits. Previously addnodes were in competition with outbound connections for access to the eight outbound slots. One result of this is that frequently a node with several addnode configured peers would end up connected to none of them, because while the addnode loop was in its two minute sleep the automatic connection logic would fill any free slots with random peers. This is particularly unwelcome to users trying to maintain links to specific nodes for fast block relay or purposes. Another result is that a group of nine or more nodes which are have addnode configured towards each other can become partitioned from the public network. This commit introduces a new limit of eight connections just for addnode peers which is not subject to any of the other connection limitations (including maxconnections). The choice of eight is sufficient so that under no condition would a user find themselves connected to fewer addnoded peers than previously. It is also low enough that users who are confused about the significance of more connections and have gotten too copy-and-paste happy will not consume more than twice the slot usage of a typical user. Any additional load on the network resulting from this will likely be offset by a reduction in users applying even more wasteful workaround for the prior behavior. The retry delays are reduced to avoid nodes sitting around without their added peers up, but are still sufficient to prevent overly aggressive repeated connections. The reduced delays also make the system much more responsive to the addnode RPC. Ban-disconnects are also exempted for peers added via addnode since the outbound addnode logic ignores bans. Previously it would ban an addnode then immediately reconnect to it. A minor change was also made to CSemaphoreGrant so that it is possible to re-acquire via an object whos grant was moved.
4 years ago
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
6 years ago
4 years ago
estimatefee / estimatepriority RPC methods New RPC methods: return an estimate of the fee (or priority) a transaction needs to be likely to confirm in a given number of blocks. Mike Hearn created the first version of this method for estimating fees. It works as follows: For transactions that took 1 to N (I picked N=25) blocks to confirm, keep N buckets with at most 100 entries in each recording the fees-per-kilobyte paid by those transactions. (separate buckets are kept for transactions that confirmed because they are high-priority) The buckets are filled as blocks are found, and are saved/restored in a new fee_estiamtes.dat file in the data directory. A few variations on Mike's initial scheme: To estimate the fee needed for a transaction to confirm in X buckets, all of the samples in all of the buckets are used and a median of all of the data is used to make the estimate. For example, imagine 25 buckets each containing the full 100 entries. Those 2,500 samples are sorted, and the estimate of the fee needed to confirm in the very next block is the 50'th-highest-fee-entry in that sorted list; the estimate of the fee needed to confirm in the next two blocks is the 150'th-highest-fee-entry, etc. That algorithm has the nice property that estimates of how much fee you need to pay to get confirmed in block N will always be greater than or equal to the estimate for block N+1. It would clearly be wrong to say "pay 11 uBTC and you'll get confirmed in 3 blocks, but pay 12 uBTC and it will take LONGER". A single block will not contribute more than 10 entries to any one bucket, so a single miner and a large block cannot overwhelm the estimates.
7 years ago
Break addnode out from the outbound connection limits. Previously addnodes were in competition with outbound connections for access to the eight outbound slots. One result of this is that frequently a node with several addnode configured peers would end up connected to none of them, because while the addnode loop was in its two minute sleep the automatic connection logic would fill any free slots with random peers. This is particularly unwelcome to users trying to maintain links to specific nodes for fast block relay or purposes. Another result is that a group of nine or more nodes which are have addnode configured towards each other can become partitioned from the public network. This commit introduces a new limit of eight connections just for addnode peers which is not subject to any of the other connection limitations (including maxconnections). The choice of eight is sufficient so that under no condition would a user find themselves connected to fewer addnoded peers than previously. It is also low enough that users who are confused about the significance of more connections and have gotten too copy-and-paste happy will not consume more than twice the slot usage of a typical user. Any additional load on the network resulting from this will likely be offset by a reduction in users applying even more wasteful workaround for the prior behavior. The retry delays are reduced to avoid nodes sitting around without their added peers up, but are still sufficient to prevent overly aggressive repeated connections. The reduced delays also make the system much more responsive to the addnode RPC. Ban-disconnects are also exempted for peers added via addnode since the outbound addnode logic ignores bans. Previously it would ban an addnode then immediately reconnect to it. A minor change was also made to CSemaphoreGrant so that it is possible to re-acquire via an object whos grant was moved.
4 years ago
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  1. // Copyright (c) 2009-2010 Satoshi Nakamoto
  2. // Copyright (c) 2009-2016 The Bitcoin Core developers
  3. // Distributed under the MIT software license, see the accompanying
  4. // file COPYING or http://www.opensource.org/licenses/mit-license.php.
  5. #if defined(HAVE_CONFIG_H)
  6. #include "config/bitcoin-config.h"
  7. #endif
  8. #include "init.h"
  9. #include "addrman.h"
  10. #include "amount.h"
  11. #include "chain.h"
  12. #include "chainparams.h"
  13. #include "checkpoints.h"
  14. #include "compat/sanity.h"
  15. #include "consensus/validation.h"
  16. #include "fs.h"
  17. #include "httpserver.h"
  18. #include "httprpc.h"
  19. #include "key.h"
  20. #include "validation.h"
  21. #include "miner.h"
  22. #include "netbase.h"
  23. #include "net.h"
  24. #include "net_processing.h"
  25. #include "policy/fees.h"
  26. #include "policy/policy.h"
  27. #include "rpc/server.h"
  28. #include "rpc/register.h"
  29. #include "rpc/blockchain.h"
  30. #include "script/standard.h"
  31. #include "script/sigcache.h"
  32. #include "scheduler.h"
  33. #include "timedata.h"
  34. #include "txdb.h"
  35. #include "txmempool.h"
  36. #include "torcontrol.h"
  37. #include "ui_interface.h"