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// Copyright (c) 2009-2010 Satoshi Nakamoto
// Copyright (c) 2009-2017 The Starwels developers
// Distributed under the MIT software license, see the accompanying
// file COPYING or http://www.opensource.org/licenses/mit-license.php.
#include <chain.h>
#include <chainparams.h>
#include <core_io.h>
#include <primitives/block.h>
#include <primitives/transaction.h>
#include <validation.h>
#include <httpserver.h>
#include <rpc/blockchain.h>
#include <rpc/server.h>
#include <streams.h>
#include <sync.h>
#include <txmempool.h>
#include <utilstrencodings.h>
#include <version.h>
#include <boost/algorithm/string.hpp>
#include <univalue.h>
static const size_t MAX_GETUTXOS_OUTPOINTS = 15; //allow a max of 15 outpoints to be queried at once
enum RetFormat {
RF_UNDEF,
RF_BINARY,
RF_HEX,
RF_JSON,
};
static const struct {
enum RetFormat rf;
const char* name;
} rf_names[] = {
{RF_UNDEF, ""},
{RF_BINARY, "bin"},
{RF_HEX, "hex"},
{RF_JSON, "json"},
};
struct CCoin {
uint32_t nHeight;
CTxOut out;
ADD_SERIALIZE_METHODS;
CCoin() : nHeight(0) {}
explicit CCoin(Coin&& in) : nHeight(in.nHeight), out(std::move(in.out)) {}
template <typename Stream, typename Operation>
inline void SerializationOp(Stream& s, Operation ser_action)
{
uint32_t nTxVerDummy = 0;
READWRITE(nTxVerDummy);
READWRITE(nHeight);
READWRITE(out);
}
};
static bool RESTERR(HTTPRequest* req, enum HTTPStatusCode status, std::string message)
{
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
req->WriteHeader("Content-Type", "text/plain");
req->WriteReply(status, message + "\r\n");
return false;
}
static enum RetFormat ParseDataFormat(std::string& param, const std::string& strReq)
{
const std::string::size_type pos = strReq.rfind('.');
if (pos == std::string::npos)
{
param = strReq;
return rf_names[0].rf;
}
param = strReq.substr(0, pos);
const std::string suff(strReq, pos + 1);
for (unsigned int i = 0; i < ARRAYLEN(rf_names); i++)
if (suff == rf_names[i].name)
return rf_names[i].rf;
/* If no suffix is found, return original string. */
param = strReq;
return rf_names[0].rf;
}
static std::string AvailableDataFormatsString()
{
std::string formats = "";
for (unsigned int i = 0; i < ARRAYLEN(rf_names); i++)
if (strlen(rf_names[i].name) > 0) {
formats.append(".");
formats.append(rf_names[i].name);
formats.append(", ");
}
if (formats.length() > 0)
return formats.substr(0, formats.length() - 2);
return formats;
}
static bool ParseHashStr(const std::string& strReq, uint256& v)
{
if (!IsHex(strReq) || (strReq.size() != 64))
return false;
v.SetHex(strReq);
return true;
}
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
static bool CheckWarmup(HTTPRequest* req)
{
std::string statusmessage;
if (RPCIsInWarmup(&statusmessage))
return RESTERR(req, HTTP_SERVICE_UNAVAILABLE, "Service temporarily unavailable: " + statusmessage);
return true;
}
static bool rest_headers(HTTPRequest* req,
const std::string& strURIPart)
{
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
if (!CheckWarmup(req))
return false;
std::string param;
const RetFormat rf = ParseDataFormat(param, strURIPart);
std::vector<std::string> path;
boost::split(path, param, boost::is_any_of("/"));
if (path.size() != 2)
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
return RESTERR(req, HTTP_BAD_REQUEST, "No header count specified. Use /rest/headers/<count>/<hash>.<ext>.");
long count = strtol(path[0].c_str(), nullptr, 10);
if (count < 1 || count > 2000)
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
return RESTERR(req, HTTP_BAD_REQUEST, "Header count out of range: " + path[0]);
std::string hashStr = path[1];
uint256 hash;
if (!ParseHashStr(hashStr, hash))
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
return RESTERR(req, HTTP_BAD_REQUEST, "Invalid hash: " + hashStr);
std::vector<const CBlockIndex *> headers;
headers.reserve(count);
{
LOCK(cs_main);
BlockMap::const_iterator it = mapBlockIndex.find(hash);
const CBlockIndex *pindex = (it != mapBlockIndex.end()) ? it->second : nullptr;
while (pindex != nullptr && chainActive.Contains(pindex)) {
headers.push_back(pindex);
if (headers.size() == (unsigned long)count)
break;
pindex = chainActive.Next(pindex);
}
}
CDataStream ssHeader(SER_NETWORK, PROTOCOL_VERSION);
for (const CBlockIndex *pindex : headers) {
ssHeader << pindex->GetBlockHeader();
}
switch (rf) {
case RF_BINARY: {
std::string binaryHeader = ssHeader.str();
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
req->WriteHeader("Content-Type", "application/octet-stream");
req->WriteReply(HTTP_OK, binaryHeader);
return true;
}
case RF_HEX: {
std::string strHex = HexStr(ssHeader.begin(), ssHeader.end()) + "\n";
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
req->WriteHeader("Content-Type", "text/plain");
req->WriteReply(HTTP_OK, strHex);
return true;
}
case RF_JSON: {
UniValue jsonHeaders(UniValue::VARR);
{
LOCK(cs_main);
for (const CBlockIndex *pindex : headers) {
jsonHeaders.push_back(blockheaderToJSON(pindex));
}
}
std::string strJSON = jsonHeaders.write() + "\n";
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
req->WriteHeader("Content-Type", "application/json");
req->WriteReply(HTTP_OK, strJSON);
return true;
}
default: {
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
return RESTERR(req, HTTP_NOT_FOUND, "output format not found (available: .bin, .hex)");
}
}
}
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
static bool rest_block(HTTPRequest* req,
const std::string& strURIPart,
bool showTxDetails)
{
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
if (!CheckWarmup(req))
return false;
std::string hashStr;
const RetFormat rf = ParseDataFormat(hashStr, strURIPart);
uint256 hash;
if (!ParseHashStr(hashStr, hash))
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
return RESTERR(req, HTTP_BAD_REQUEST, "Invalid hash: " + hashStr);
CBlock block;
CBlockIndex* pblockindex = nullptr;
{
LOCK(cs_main);
if (mapBlockIndex.count(hash) == 0)
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
return RESTERR(req, HTTP_NOT_FOUND, hashStr + " not found");
pblockindex = mapBlockIndex[hash];
if (fHavePruned && !(pblockindex->nStatus & BLOCK_HAVE_DATA) && pblockindex->nTx > 0)
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
return RESTERR(req, HTTP_NOT_FOUND, hashStr + " not available (pruned data)");
if (!ReadBlockFromDisk(block, pblockindex, Params().GetConsensus()))
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
return RESTERR(req, HTTP_NOT_FOUND, hashStr + " not found");
}
CDataStream ssBlock(SER_NETWORK, PROTOCOL_VERSION | RPCSerializationFlags());
ssBlock << block;
switch (rf) {
case RF_BINARY: {
std::string binaryBlock = ssBlock.str();
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
req->WriteHeader("Content-Type", "application/octet-stream");
req->WriteReply(HTTP_OK, binaryBlock);
return true;
}
case RF_HEX: {
std::string strHex = HexStr(ssBlock.begin(), ssBlock.end()) + "\n";
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
req->WriteHeader("Content-Type", "text/plain");
req->WriteReply(HTTP_OK, strHex);
return true;
}
case RF_JSON: {
UniValue objBlock;
{
LOCK(cs_main);
objBlock = blockToJSON(block, pblockindex, showTxDetails);
}
std::string strJSON = objBlock.write() + "\n";
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
req->WriteHeader("Content-Type", "application/json");
req->WriteReply(HTTP_OK, strJSON);
return true;
}
default: {
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
return RESTERR(req, HTTP_NOT_FOUND, "output format not found (available: " + AvailableDataFormatsString() + ")");
}
}
}
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
static bool rest_block_extended(HTTPRequest* req, const std::string& strURIPart)
{
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
return rest_block(req, strURIPart, true);
}
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
static bool rest_block_notxdetails(HTTPRequest* req, const std::string& strURIPart)
{
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
return rest_block(req, strURIPart, false);
}
// A bit of a hack - dependency on a function defined in rpc/blockchain.cpp
UniValue getblockchaininfo(const JSONRPCRequest& request);
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
static bool rest_chaininfo(HTTPRequest* req, const std::string& strURIPart)
{
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
if (!CheckWarmup(req))
return false;
std::string param;
const RetFormat rf = ParseDataFormat(param, strURIPart);
switch (rf) {
case RF_JSON: {
JSONRPCRequest jsonRequest;
jsonRequest.params = UniValue(UniValue::VARR);
UniValue chainInfoObject = getblockchaininfo(jsonRequest);
std::string strJSON = chainInfoObject.write() + "\n";
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
req->WriteHeader("Content-Type", "application/json");
req->WriteReply(HTTP_OK, strJSON);
return true;
}
default: {
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
return RESTERR(req, HTTP_NOT_FOUND, "output format not found (available: json)");
}
}
}
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
static bool rest_mempool_info(HTTPRequest* req, const std::string& strURIPart)
{
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
if (!CheckWarmup(req))
return false;
std::string param;
const RetFormat rf = ParseDataFormat(param, strURIPart);
switch (rf) {
case RF_JSON: {
UniValue mempoolInfoObject = mempoolInfoToJSON();
std::string strJSON = mempoolInfoObject.write() + "\n";
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
req->WriteHeader("Content-Type", "application/json");
req->WriteReply(HTTP_OK, strJSON);
return true;
}
default: {
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
return RESTERR(req, HTTP_NOT_FOUND, "output format not found (available: json)");
}
}
}
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
static bool rest_mempool_contents(HTTPRequest* req, const std::string& strURIPart)
{
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
if (!CheckWarmup(req))
return false;
std::string param;
const RetFormat rf = ParseDataFormat(param, strURIPart);
switch (rf) {
case RF_JSON: {
UniValue mempoolObject = mempoolToJSON(true);
std::string strJSON = mempoolObject.write() + "\n";
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
req->WriteHeader("Content-Type", "application/json");
req->WriteReply(HTTP_OK, strJSON);
return true;
}
default: {
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
return RESTERR(req, HTTP_NOT_FOUND, "output format not found (available: json)");
}
}
}
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
static bool rest_tx(HTTPRequest* req, const std::string& strURIPart)
{
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
if (!CheckWarmup(req))
return false;
std::string hashStr;
const RetFormat rf = ParseDataFormat(hashStr, strURIPart);
uint256 hash;
if (!ParseHashStr(hashStr, hash))
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
return RESTERR(req, HTTP_BAD_REQUEST, "Invalid hash: " + hashStr);
CTransactionRef tx;
uint256 hashBlock = uint256();
if (!GetTransaction(hash, tx, Params().GetConsensus(), hashBlock, true))
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
return RESTERR(req, HTTP_NOT_FOUND, hashStr + " not found");
CDataStream ssTx(SER_NETWORK, PROTOCOL_VERSION | RPCSerializationFlags());
ssTx << tx;
switch (rf) {
case RF_BINARY: {
std::string binaryTx = ssTx.str();
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
req->WriteHeader("Content-Type", "application/octet-stream");
req->WriteReply(HTTP_OK, binaryTx);
return true;
}
case RF_HEX: {
std::string strHex = HexStr(ssTx.begin(), ssTx.end()) + "\n";
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
req->WriteHeader("Content-Type", "text/plain");
req->WriteReply(HTTP_OK, strHex);
return true;
}
case RF_JSON: {
UniValue objTx(UniValue::VOBJ);
TxToUniv(*tx, hashBlock, objTx);
std::string strJSON = objTx.write() + "\n";
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
req->WriteHeader("Content-Type", "application/json");
req->WriteReply(HTTP_OK, strJSON);
return true;
}
default: {
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
return RESTERR(req, HTTP_NOT_FOUND, "output format not found (available: " + AvailableDataFormatsString() + ")");
}
}
}
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
static bool rest_getutxos(HTTPRequest* req, const std::string& strURIPart)
{
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
if (!CheckWarmup(req))
return false;
std::string param;
const RetFormat rf = ParseDataFormat(param, strURIPart);
std::vector<std::string> uriParts;
if (param.length() > 1)
{
std::string strUriParams = param.substr(1);
boost::split(uriParts, strUriParams, boost::is_any_of("/"));
}
// throw exception in case of an empty request
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
std::string strRequestMutable = req->ReadBody();
if (strRequestMutable.length() == 0 && uriParts.size() == 0)
return RESTERR(req, HTTP_BAD_REQUEST, "Error: empty request");
bool fInputParsed = false;
bool fCheckMemPool = false;
std::vector<COutPoint> vOutPoints;
// parse/deserialize input
// input-format = output-format, rest/getutxos/bin requires binary input, gives binary output, ...
if (uriParts.size() > 0)
{
//inputs is sent over URI scheme (/rest/getutxos/checkmempool/txid1-n/txid2-n/...)
if (uriParts[0] == "checkmempool") fCheckMemPool = true;
for (size_t i = (fCheckMemPool) ? 1 : 0; i < uriParts.size(); i++)
{
uint256 txid;
int32_t nOutput;
std::string strTxid = uriParts[i].substr(0, uriParts[i].find('-'));
std::string strOutput = uriParts[i].substr(uriParts[i].find('-')+1);
if (!ParseInt32(strOutput, &nOutput) || !IsHex(strTxid))
return RESTERR(req, HTTP_BAD_REQUEST, "Parse error");
txid.SetHex(strTxid);
vOutPoints.push_back(COutPoint(txid, (uint32_t)nOutput));
}
if (vOutPoints.size() > 0)
fInputParsed = true;
else
return RESTERR(req, HTTP_BAD_REQUEST, "Error: empty request");
}
switch (rf) {
case RF_HEX: {
// convert hex to bin, continue then with bin part
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
std::vector<unsigned char> strRequestV = ParseHex(strRequestMutable);
strRequestMutable.assign(strRequestV.begin(), strRequestV.end());
}
case RF_BINARY: {
try {
//deserialize only if user sent a request
if (strRequestMutable.size() > 0)
{
if (fInputParsed) //don't allow sending input over URI and HTTP RAW DATA
return RESTERR(req, HTTP_BAD_REQUEST, "Combination of URI scheme inputs and raw post data is not allowed");
CDataStream oss(SER_NETWORK, PROTOCOL_VERSION);
oss << strRequestMutable;
oss >> fCheckMemPool;
oss >> vOutPoints;
}
} catch (const std::ios_base::failure& e) {
// abort in case of unreadable binary data
return RESTERR(req, HTTP_BAD_REQUEST, "Parse error");
}
break;
}
case RF_JSON: {
if (!fInputParsed)
return RESTERR(req, HTTP_BAD_REQUEST, "Error: empty request");
break;
}
default: {
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
return RESTERR(req, HTTP_NOT_FOUND, "output format not found (available: " + AvailableDataFormatsString() + ")");
}
}
// limit max outpoints
if (vOutPoints.size() > MAX_GETUTXOS_OUTPOINTS)
return RESTERR(req, HTTP_BAD_REQUEST, strprintf("Error: max outpoints exceeded (max: %d, tried: %d)", MAX_GETUTXOS_OUTPOINTS, vOutPoints.size()));
// check spentness and form a bitmap (as well as a JSON capable human-readable string representation)
std::vector<unsigned char> bitmap;
std::vector<CCoin> outs;
std::string bitmapStringRepresentation;
std::vector<bool> hits;
bitmap.resize((vOutPoints.size() + 7) / 8);
{
LOCK2(cs_main, mempool.cs);
CCoinsView viewDummy;
CCoinsViewCache view(&viewDummy);
CCoinsViewCache& viewChain = *pcoinsTip;
CCoinsViewMemPool viewMempool(&viewChain, mempool);
if (fCheckMemPool)
view.SetBackend(viewMempool); // switch cache backend to db+mempool in case user likes to query mempool
for (size_t i = 0; i < vOutPoints.size(); i++) {
bool hit = false;
Coin coin;
if (view.GetCoin(vOutPoints[i], coin) && !mempool.isSpent(vOutPoints[i])) {
hit = true;
outs.emplace_back(std::move(coin));
}
hits.push_back(hit);
bitmapStringRepresentation.append(hit ? "1" : "0"); // form a binary string representation (human-readable for json output)
bitmap[i / 8] |= ((uint8_t)hit) << (i % 8);
}
}
switch (rf) {
case RF_BINARY: {
// serialize data
// use exact same output as mentioned in Bip64
CDataStream ssGetUTXOResponse(SER_NETWORK, PROTOCOL_VERSION);
ssGetUTXOResponse << chainActive.Height() << chainActive.Tip()->GetBlockHash() << bitmap << outs;
std::string ssGetUTXOResponseString = ssGetUTXOResponse.str();
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
req->WriteHeader("Content-Type", "application/octet-stream");
req->WriteReply(HTTP_OK, ssGetUTXOResponseString);
return true;
}
case RF_HEX: {
CDataStream ssGetUTXOResponse(SER_NETWORK, PROTOCOL_VERSION);
ssGetUTXOResponse << chainActive.Height() << chainActive.Tip()->GetBlockHash() << bitmap << outs;
std::string strHex = HexStr(ssGetUTXOResponse.begin(), ssGetUTXOResponse.end()) + "\n";
evhttpd implementation - *Replace usage of boost::asio with [libevent2](http://libevent.org/)*. boost::asio is not part of C++11, so unlike other boost there is no forwards-compatibility reason to stick with it. Together with #4738 (convert json_spirit to UniValue), this rids Bitcoin Core of the worst offenders with regard to compile-time slowness. - *Replace spit-and-duct-tape http server with evhttp*. Front-end http handling is handled by libevent, a work queue (with configurable depth and parallelism) is used to handle application requests. - *Wrap HTTP request in C++ class*; this makes the application code mostly HTTP-server-neutral - *Refactor RPC to move all http-specific code to a separate file*. Theoreticaly this can allow building without HTTP server but with another RPC backend, e.g. Qt's debug console (currently not implemented) or future RPC mechanisms people may want to use. - *HTTP dispatch mechanism*; services (e.g., RPC, REST) register which URL paths they want to handle. By using a proven, high-performance asynchronous networking library (also used by Tor) and HTTP server, problems such as #5674, #5655, #344 should be avoided. What works? bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, bitcoin-qt. Unit tests and RPC/REST tests pass. The aim for now is everything but SSL support. Configuration options: - `-rpcthreads`: repurposed as "number of work handler threads". Still defaults to 4. - `-rpcworkqueue`: maximum depth of work queue. When this is reached, new requests will return a 500 Internal Error. - `-rpctimeout`: inactivity time, in seconds, after which to disconnect a client. - `-debug=http`: low-level http activity logging
8 years ago
req->WriteHeader("Content-Type", "text/plain");
req->WriteReply(HTTP_OK, strHex);